FAQs

POPULAR QUESTIONS
  • How do I get rid of peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing software?

    If you are not using P2P software for legitimate purposes (e.g. to upload and share non-copyrighted or other approved materials), the easiest and most effective step is to completely remove all P2P programmes from your computer or other internet-connected device/s. If you have received an Educational Email from your ISP, the detailed information about that email on this Get it Right Information Portal includes the name of the P2P software programme detected to have been used to share the file that was confirmed to be infringing.

    Remove all file sharing programmes from all devices using your internet connection. (If you are unsure of the names of programmes that might be on devices, look for common names like BitTorrent, uTorrent, Deluge, iLivid, and Tixati – but there are others). Remember also that the file sharing software may be running via an App on your tablet or another device - or it may be running on a gaming server or other box that is attached to the internet and to your network. If you have received an Educational Email from your ISP, the detailed information about that email on this Get it Right Information Portal includes the name of the P2P software programme detected to have been used to share the file that was confirmed to be infringing.

    If your device is a desktop or laptop computer, locate the P2P software that you would like to remove on the list of installed programmes or in the Applications folder. If it is tablet or other mobile device, remember also that the file sharing software may be running via an App. Or the software may be running on a gaming server, IPTV box or other device that is attached both to the internet and to your network. Make sure that you look to see if there are multiple P2P programmes or Apps running and delete or uninstall them all. Once you have removed all P2P programmes, reboot your computer or other device and check that there are no other P2P programmes or Apps running.

  • What if my current Internet Protocol (IP) address does not match the one listed in the Educational Email?

    This doesn’t mean that the IP address in the Educational Email is mistaken. IP addresses are not permanent; they change from time to time. Your ISP keeps records so it can determine which IP address was assigned to your account at any given time. According to your ISP’s records, when the IP address in question was identified illegally uploading and sharing the content file, that IP address was assigned to your account.

  • How did you get my email address?

    Content owners do not have your email address. The Educational Email has come from your Internet Service Provider (ISP) after it was notified by content owners about an instance of copyright infringement - and after the ISP has confirmed that the IP address concerned was associated with your account at the date and time on which the file sharing occurred.

  • Will this programme shut down my internet connection?

    No. This Get it Right Educational Email Programme is intended to provide you with information and will not automatically trigger further action. However copyright infringement is against the law and the rules of your account do not permit it.

    To ensure you are not at risk of potential penalties in the future, please take action now to stop any illegal uploading and sharing of files occurring on your internet account.

  • Does this mean I am “blacklisted” or have a “record” with my ISP?

    There is no “blacklisting” of customer accounts. Even if you receive multiple Educational Emails, you will have your account record cleared completely if no further notices of infringement are received by your ISP for a continuous 12 month period.

  • Are you monitoring my online activity?

    This programme does not involve any monitoring of internet traffic by Internet Service Providers. The detection and confirmation of infringement is done by content owners or their authorised representatives on peer-to-peer networks only. Content owners do this by using proven electronic scanning technologies which are searching publicly available information. They do not have access to private browsing information or general internet use.

  • What about data protection?

    We have built the Get it Right Educational Email programme around a commitment to respect your privacy rights. At no time will Internet Service Providers share personal information (name, address, etc.) with anyone else (including the content owners or other ISPs) except pursuant to a properly issued court order requested if the infringing behaviour continues. The entire programme is fully compliant with applicable laws and regulations including the Data Protection Act 1998 and with best practices as published by the ICO (Information Commissioner’s Office).

  • What are peer-to-peer networks?

    Peer-to-peer networks communicate among connected computers and other devices when files are being uploaded and shared, and then they facilitate the transfer of data from one user to another. Research has determined that most of the content shared on these networks is in breach of copyright.

    You may have heard of the following peer-to-peer software applications: BitTorrent, μTorrent, and Limewire.

    Peer-to-peer software applications can upload files from your computer without your permission or knowledge. If your computer is online and the P2P software that is running on it is connected to a peer-to-peer network and communicating that there are files available to be uploaded and shared with others, other computers or devices that are connected to that same P2P network can download files from your device, without you noticing.

    This is why you may not recognise the time and date of the infringement.

    It would explain also why a single content file (such as a music track or album, a film or TV show) may be listed multiple times in the list of copyright infringement activity that is associated with one or more Educational Email/s that you have received for your account. That can happen because, as long as the file is present in a shared folder on a computer connected to your internet connection and as long as the P2P software is running, that software will be communicating with other computers that are also running P2P software to let them know that the file is available to be uploaded. So it may be that multiple users have accessed the same content from you and that the uploading and sharing of that single file has been detected and confirmed more than once as a breach of copyright.

    Peer-to-peer networks do not only facilitate copyright infringement through file sharing, they can also make your computer vulnerable to viruses and malware and your personal information may be at greater risk of being stolen.

  • I recognise the file name, but not the time/date

    This is probably because the P2P software running on your computer or other internet-connected device was connected to a peer-to-peer network at a time when you were not using the device.

    Peer-to-peer software can upload files from your computer while you are online, without you noticing. This is why you may recognise the file, but not the time or date of the infringement.

    Peer-to-peer networks do not only facilitate copyright infringement through file sharing, they can also make your computer vulnerable to viruses and malware and your personal information may be at greater risk of being stolen.

    Unless you have a legitimate reason to use P2P software and networks, to avoid this issue in the future you should uninstall all peer-to-peer software from your computer. More details

  • Why does the same file appear multiple times?

    This is because your computer or other internet-connected device has been detected multiple times sharing the same file. Once a file is made available for sharing via a P2P network, it may be that multiple users have accessed the same content from you and that sharing has been detected and confirmed more than once as a breach of copyright.

    Unless you have a legitimate reason to use peer-to-peer networks, to avoid this issue in the future you should uninstall all peer-to-peer networks from your computer. More details

  • What happens if I don’t think the information is correct?

    The Educational Email was sent by your Internet Service Provider because sharing of copyrighted material was detected on an IP address that your ISP has confirmed was assigned to your account when the file sharing occurred. You can find more information about the specific activity by looking at the relevant pages on this Get it Right Information Portal.

    Your ISP has sent an Educational Email to you because you are the account holder - and a computer or other internet-connected device on your network was detected and confirmed to have shared a file that is protected by copyright. So you have not been contacted because it is known or believed that you - personally - shared the copyrighted content.

    If you don’t believe you have shared copyrighted files without permission, and you don’t use peer-to-peer networks (which are commonly how illegal file sharing takes place), then someone else who has access to your internet account and who connects a computer or other device to your network may be responsible.

    If your wireless network is not secured properly, this could be someone outside your home. Please take steps to secure your network with a password - and share that password only with people that you authorise and trust to connect to your network.

    If your wireless network is already secured, please check with everyone who has access to it that they are not using file sharing software and haven’t infringed copyright online.

    Note that, if your current Internet Protocol (IP) address is different to that in the Educational Email or in the list of associated infringements, it does not mean that the email that you received or the information in the list is wrong. IP addresses are not permanent; they may change from time to time. Your ISP keeps records so it can determine which IP address was assigned to your account at any given time. According to your ISP’s records, when the IP address in question was identified illegally distributing and sharing the content file, that IP address was assigned to your account.

    If there is no further activity identified for an IP address associated with your account, you will NOT receive further Educational Emails.

  • How was my account identified?

    Content owners or their representatives join peer-to-peer networks in order to locate the music, movies, TV shows, books and other online content that they own. Once they see a title being made available to be uploaded and shared, they confirm that it is copyrighted content by downloading and verifying the file.

    After confirming that a file is being uploaded and shared illegally, content owners identify the Internet Protocol (IP) address that is making the file available.

    Your Internet Service Provider has sent an Educational Email to you because you are the account holder - and a computer or other internet-connected device on your network was detected and confirmed to have uploaded and shared a file that is protected by copyright. So you have not been contacted because it is known or believed that you - personally - shared the copyrighted content.

    There is no monitoring of any internet traffic by ISPs. The detection of files being shared and the verification of infringement is done by content owners on peer-to-peer networks only.

    The Get it Right Educational Email Programme is triggered by activity only on peer-to-peer file sharing networks and not related to general internet use (such as general browsing or streaming).

  • What information do you hold about me?

    The Get It Right Educational Email Programme does not hold any data or information about individuals. The copyright owners monitor peer-to-peer networks to identify instances where their content is uploaded and shared without permission and identify the internet protocol (IP) addresses which carried out the infringement. The copyright owners do not know, and do not receive from the Internet Service Providers, any details of the account holders.

    The copyright owners contact the applicable Internet Service Provider (participants are BT, NowTV, PlusNet, Sky, Talk-Talk and Virgin Media) so that the ISP can get in touch with the applicable account holder for each detected instance and send an Educational Email. This information is not stored long term by the ISPs. If no details alleging copyright infringements are received by your ISP for a continuous 12 month period, all activity on your account related to this (or any previous) Educational Email will be deleted and no record will be kept.

  • What should I do now?

    If you are using peer-to-peer software to upload and share files that infringe copyright, please stop doing so immediately.

    If you haven’t uploaded and shared files personally, please make sure your wireless network is secure and that no-one else who is allowed to use your network connection is using P2P software, connecting to peer-to-peer networks and sharing copyrighted material without permission from the owner.

    There are plenty of legitimate places where you can get access to all the content that you love. We’ve made it simple to access it all by providing lots of helpful information and links on our website, Get It Right From A Genuine Site. Click here for more details.

    Our campaign helps you get the music, TV, films, games, books, newspapers, magazines, sport and photographs that you love from genuine services and encourages you to support UK creativity. Every time you watch, listen, read or play, you make a choice - either to support the content and creativity that you love and help them flourish and grow, or to contribute nothing. By supporting what you love, you invest in creating more of it and in the development of new artists, ideas and innovation.

  • Where can I find more information?

    You can find more information about copyright infringement, the Get it Right Educational Email Programme and where to get genuine content from in the links below. Please note: we are not responsible for the content in external links.

    https://www.getsafeonline.org/

  • How can I tell if something is copyrighted?

    Using a genuine source or service is the quickest and easiest way to legally access the content you love.

    By accessing content through legitimate sites and services such as these https://www.getitrightfromagenuinesite.org/genuine-sites/, you can be sure that copyright laws are being observed and that the creative work you enjoy is being supported.

  • How long will I continue to receive Educational Emails from my Internet Service Provider (ISP)?

    You may receive periodic Educational Email alerts whenever content owners detect new copyright infringement activity through peer-to-peer networks, and the IP address associated with such activity is confirmed by your ISP to be associated with your account.

    After an Educational Email has been sent, there is a 20 day grace period during which time you will not receive any further emails. However, if further copyright infringement activity occurs and is detected after the 20 day grace period, you may receive another email from your ISP.

    If no further infringements occur and are detected and verified to be associated with your account, you will receive no more Educational Emails. Furthermore, all data related to this and to previous Educational Emails will be deleted after 12 months.

  • I use peer-to-peer networks to share legal material, so how do I make sure I’m not accidentally sharing copyrighted files?

    Peer-to-peer technology isn’t illegal in itself. However the most popular P2P software is often used to share copyrighted files without permission - and that actually means that most of the files being shared on P2P networks are not legal files. Files from a sharing folder on your computer or other internet-connected device can be shared unintentionally without your knowledge if the P2P software is running on your computer. So it is important that you put into your sharing folder (and make available for sharing) only those files that you know to be legal, and that you make sure that your P2P software is running only when you are using P2P networks for accessing or sharing legal material.

    If you do not want to fully remove or delete the peer-to-peer software and/or Apps from your computer, tablet, gaming box or other Internet-connected device, you can make sure you aren’t sharing copyrighted material with the following steps:

    1. Identify all peer-to-peer applications and programmes on your computer and/or any other computer or Internet-connected device that is using your network. If you have received an Educational Email from your ISP, the detailed information about that email on this Get it Right Information Portal includes the name of the P2P software programme detected to have been used to share the file that was confirmed to be infringing.

    2. Change the personal settings for each of these programs (away from default) to ensure that only material you intend to share and you have authorisation to share is available to others. You may also want to check that shared folders don’t contain any personal documents or identifiable information so as to avoid sharing those by mistake and risking being a victim of identity fraud.

    3. Check the settings after every software update, as sometimes updates can reverse settings and open folders up to sharing. If you have automatic updates installed, it may be worth switching to manual control to prevent unintentional file sharing.

    4. Make sure the P2P software is turned off when you aren’t using it. Many peer-to-peer programs will continue running in the background, even when you are not using them, and/or they will start up automatically when you switch on your computer. This means your shared files are available for other users to access whenever your computer or other device is connected to the internet, even when you are not around and using it.

  • Why does copyright matter?

    Intellectual property industries, like film, music, television and computer software, are central to the health and stability of the UK economy. The UK's creative industry supports around 2.8 million UK jobs each year, contributes about £18 billion in exports around the world and contributes about £10 million per hour to the UK economy.

    Who pays when movies are stolen or movie files are shared without permission? Local cinemas, DVD rental stores, the writers, actors and other artists who contribute to the movies we love, and the stuntmen, make-up artists, grips and other production crew members who depend on a healthy industry for their jobs and their families’ income. Also it affects the craftspeople who make props, the caterers who feed the crews, the drivers who drive the production vehicles, the technology specialists who create the special effects, the musicians that play on the sound tracks and so on.

    Film theft also has an enormous impact on movie fans around the world. High quality movies and television shows are expensive to produce. In fact, six out of ten movies never break even and recover the cost of making and marketing the film. If movies are routinely stolen and distributed over the internet or on illegal DVDs, then it becomes less likely that people will invest in the big, high-quality films and TV shows we love.

  • How do I secure my Wifi?

    We have created a short guide to help you secure your network, which you can find here.

  • What is an IP address?

    Your Internet Protocol (IP) address is an unique address that is used by your laptop, tablet, or smartphone or other internet-connected device to identify itself and communicate with the internet and with other devices. An IP address is similar to a street address or telephone number in that it is used to uniquely identify an entity. Today, for example, devices like refrigerators and home security systems communicate with the internet, in order that they may report failures or facilitate remote access.

Cool Get It Right guy